Penny Market achieves sustainability certification

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German-owned supermarket chain Penny Market Hungary has achieved the ISO 50001 certification as a recognition of its efforts in energy saving and sustainability, and is set to use the international standard in all of its shops, warehouses, and offices in Hungary, according to a press release sent to the Budapest Business Journal.

Investing a significant amount of money into sustainability measures, according to the press release, the company now has 216 shops completing ISO 50001 certification, as well as three logistical warehouses. Penny Market has become one of the largest retail chains in Hungary to achieve the certification.

"Sustainability, protecting the environment, and modern production conditions are all of key importance for our company group, and getting the certificate proves weʼre on the right track," said Florian Naegele, the newly appointed CEO of Penny Market Hungary who took over on October 1. "Our steps in energy saving are a result of a long-term process, which needed significant commitments and efforts from all of our colleagues. Our plans, however, do not stop at this point; weʼll continue developments in energy efficiency."

The company drew up a medium-term investment plan in 2018, which includes providing LED lighting to stores and logistics centers, modernizing heating systems, and creating solar panel and energy monitoring systems. Penny Market says it is committed to complete these steps by 2022.

"Our aim is to decrease specific electricity consumption of the retail areas by 10% in the next four years, and to cut the specific fuel consumption of our company car fleet by 5%," said Silke Janz, Penny Market Hungaryʼs CFO. "Besides, we also commit to increasing the use of renewable energy to 2% of the total," she added.

Penny Marketʼs aim is to decrease its specific CO2 emissions by 23%, in line with owner the REWE groupʼs sustainibility strategy, according to the press release. The company therefore provides training for its employees and energy experts to increase commitment and consciousness.

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