'Complex Support' Required to Place Much of Labor Market Reserve

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State secretary for employment policy Sándor Czomba said "complex support" would be needed to integrate around two-thirds of the 300,000 Hungarians who weren't working into the labor force in a statement issued on Tuesday, according to a report by state news wire MTI.

Czomba noted that the government aimed to raise the activity rate among 15- to 64-year-olds from 78% to 85%. He added that the task would present a challenge no smaller than the government's earlier, fulfilled pledge to create 1 million jobs.

The government puts Hungary's potential labor market reserve at around 300,000 people, including job-seekers and economically inactive people.

About 40,000 of those people, who have skills and motivation, can be placed in jobs "relatively quickly" with a little support, while another 50,000 people could enter the job market with training, which the government will support, he said.

Around 150,000 from the labor market reserve aren't prepared to start jobs immediately, but will need a longer period of complex support, including training, wage subsidies, help commuting and healthcare or social services, while around 60,000 economically inactive Hungarians will also need multipronged support to accommodate their situations, he added.

Czomba said special attention would be paid to helping young Hungarians who neither work nor study to find jobs.

He added that the more than HUF 460 billion Ginop Plusz European Union-funded economic development program would contribute to the government's action plan for boosting the activity rate and employment.

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