Hungary inks cooperation agreements with Brazil, Nigeria

Int’l Relations

Hungaryʼs Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade Péter Szijjártó held talks and signed bilateral economic cooperation agreements with his Brazilian and Nigerian counterparts on the sidelines of the fourth Nuclear Security Summit in Washington, D.C., on Friday, Hungarian news agency MTI reported today.

Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade Péter Szijjártó at the fourth Nuclear Security Summit in Washington, D.C., on Friday. (Photo: MTI/Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade)

Szijjártó told MTI that both countries have great economic potential and are seen by Hungary as important economic partners.

The minister and his Brazilian counterpart Mauro Vieira agreed on three issues. Hungaryʼs Eximbank will open a $200 million credit line to promote efforts to increase Hungarian food sales to Brazil. Under the “Science without Borders” educational exchange program, Hungary will receive another 250 Brazilian students from next autumn. Furthermore, Hungary pledged to support progress in negotiations on a free trade agreement between the European Union and the South American common market Mercosur.

Szijjártó and Nigerian Foreign Minister Geoffrey Onyeama agreed to conclude an economic cooperation agreement. They also agreed that Eximbank would open a $69 mln credit line to promote bilateral trade. Hungary has sent a commercial diplomat to Lagos to boost Hungarian dairy, meat, fruit and farm machinery sales to Nigeria, Szijjártó said.

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