Govʼt to boycott EP debate on rule of law in Hungary

EU

The government will not participate in a debate on Hungary in the European Parliament (EP) next week, Gergely Gulyás, the minister heading the Prime Minister’s Office, said at a press conference held on Thursday in Budapest, arguing that there are "no genuine grounds whatsoever" for such a debate.

Gulyás was cited as saying by official government website kormany.hu that the mandate of the incumbent EP will run out in May, and so it is "a product nearing its sell-by date."

Hungary is hoping to see an anti-immigration majority in EU institutions – including the European Parliament and the European Commission – emerge instead of the present pro-immigration majority, and the EP elections are a crucial element in this, he added.

Questioning the rule of law in Hungary is "only an excuse," the minister said, and a sanction for Hungary being the first country to declare that it will not accept immigration and wants to remedy demographic challenges through family policy measures.

Gulyás described the proposition that issues regarding the rule of law should be tied to payments from the EU budget as "sheer blackmail." The Council adopts the budget with a unanimous vote, and therefore proposals of this nature will be rejected, he noted.

The European Parliament is scheduled to hear Council and Commission statements on "The rule of law and fundamental rights in Hungary, developments since September 2018" on Wednesday, January 30, reported Hungarian news agency MTI.

ADVERTISEMENT

Századvég raises GDP forecast to 7.8% Analysis

Századvég raises GDP forecast to 7.8%

Opposition parties to begin PM candidate primaries Elections

Opposition parties to begin PM candidate primaries

New editor-in-chief at Betone Studio Appointments

New editor-in-chief at Betone Studio

Budapest leaders make public transport free for under-14s City

Budapest leaders make public transport free for under-14s

SUPPORT THE BUDAPEST BUSINESS JOURNAL

Producing journalism that is worthy of the name is a costly business. For 27 years, the publishers, editors and reporters of the Budapest Business Journal have striven to bring you business news that works, information that you can trust, that is factual, accurate and presented without fear or favor.
Newspaper organizations across the globe have struggled to find a business model that allows them to continue to excel, without compromising their ability to perform. Most recently, some have experimented with the idea of involving their most important stakeholders, their readers.
We would like to offer that same opportunity to our readers. We would like to invite you to help us deliver the quality business journalism you require. Hit our Support the BBJ button and you can choose the how much and how often you send us your contributions.