Orbán tells WSJ: ‘I don’t like fences’

Interview

Wikimedia Commons/Délmagyarország/Schmidt Andrea

Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orbán reiterated his objection of criticism over the fence that Hungary erected on the Serbian border as a “temporary measure” to “keep asylum seekers out”, The Wall Street Journal reported today in an interview with Orbán.

The fence on the Serbian border.  Photo: (Wikimedia Commons/Délmagyarország/Schmidt Andrea)

“I don’t like fences. Who likes fences? We’re not stupid,” he told The Wall Street Journal yesterday. Talking to the WSJ, he called it  “clear evidence of hypocrisy in European politics” that only Hungary is being targeted and not the four other EU countries, including Spain and France,  that have already built similar barriers. “Our wall is the number five wall” the prime minister told the WSJ.

The prime minister defended the Hungarian government’s treatment of migrants arriving to the country, and passing through, the WSJ reported, adding that Orbán also “dismissed images of police throwing food to locked-up migrants as unrepresentative of the response.”

“I can’t say that Hungary is a perfect country…but all in all we are a decent country with a good heart,” he reportedly told the WSJ. The prime minister added that many refugees who have gone through Hungary entered the European Union in Greece, where they should have been registered.

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