Uber Hungary urges negotiations with ministry

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The Hungarian subsidiary of U.S.-based ride-sharing company Uber sent a letter yesterday to the National Development Ministry, asking for an opportunity to speak with state secretary János Fónagy about how Uber has been regulated in other countries, according to reports. The Hungarian Parliament could discuss proposed measures to ban Uber in the country as early as next week.

In the letter sent to the ministry, Zoltán Fekete, Uber Hungary’s operative director, outlined proposals on regulations and taxation on the ride-sharing service, and also asked for a personal meeting with the state secretary. 

In just a few days Uber collected approximately 30,000 signatures supporting the company’s operations in Hungary. Uber launched a petition last week after the Hungarian government announced proposed changes that could halt Uber from operating in the country. Under these changes Uber drivers operating unlawfully could lose their licenses if caught.

According to Fekete, blocking Uberʼs Hungarian website is not the right approach. He stressed that Uber currently operates in 415 cities around the world. Fekete said that measures the government is weighing following the demonstrations of “150 loudmouth taxi drivers” are unfavorable for approximately 150,000 Hungarian users.

Hungarian taxi drivers demonstrated in the capital nearly half a dozen times this year alone against ride-sharing services, claiming that such services operate unlawfully, and as such are able to offer lower fares.

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