Govʼt to gag state-run cultural institutions, report says

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All state-managed cultural institutions will reportedly need to seek approval from the Ministry of Human Capacities (Emmi) 48 hours before calling press conferences or making public statements, current affairs magazine hvg.hu reports.

Institutions such as the Opera House may now have to report to the government before making public statements.

Institutions such as the Opera House, National Museum, and Müpa Budapest (formerly the Palace of Arts), as well as various other establishments under the aegis of the Ministry of Human Capacities (Emmi), will not be permitted to hold press conferences, conduct interviews or release statements without the approval of the government, according to the report in hvg.hu.

The news outlet claims that it has come into possession of Emmi letters to the state-managed cultural institutions to announce the rule. The institutions will have to disclose the name and position of the person making the statement, alongside the name of the media outlet, as well as the interviewʼs main topic and the "main message" of the statement.

According to the report, final approval will be granted by the ministry headed by Antal Rogán, minister in charge of the Prime Ministerʼs Cabinet Office.

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