Hungarian swimmer tears up contract, plans to train solo

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After failing to reach an agreement with the Hungarian Swimming Federation, Hungarian competitive swimmer Katinka Hosszú today tore up her contract with the federation and announced at a press conference that she would train privately on her own, according to reports.

Katinka Hosszú (right) prepares for 200 meter backstroke next to Emily Seebohm in Kazan in 2015. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

The contract Hosszú tore apart today valued at approximately HUF 12 million, was offered to her for promoting the 2017 World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, the swimmer claims. She reportedly said she does not need the money, and that the federation should keep it and use it to establish “appropriate conditions” for Hungarian swimmers.

Hosszú said if she cannot agree with the federation, she will train independently, but still wishes to compete as a Hungarian, according to reports. She reportedly said it has never occurred to her to compete under the flag of the United States, where she studied and trained at length during her swimming career, under her husband, head coach Shane Tusup.

Tamás Gyárfás, the president of the Hungarian Swimming Federation, told Hungarian online daily hvg.hu that it is unclear to him what private preparations would mean, but the federation is committed to agreeing with the swimmer.

The so-called “Iron Lady”, who is a five-time long-course world champion and world record holder in multiple events, recently voiced her criticism of the Hungarian Swimming Federation, claiming the body continuously establishes high expectations of Hungarian swimmers but does little to meet the needs of their athletes.

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