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3 out of 10 Hungarians changed jobs due to workplace stress

About three out of ten employees in Hungary have already changed jobs due to workplace stress, with most preferring to deal with tense situations by smoking, gossiping, and drinking coffee, according to research by job search website Profession.hu.

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The website asked more than 1,000 people about workplace stress, repeating research it also conducted last year. According to the respondents, part-time employees face significantly less stress, as some 27% of four-hour workers said that their job is not stressful at all; a mere 9% of full-time workers responded with the same answer.

Most of those surveyed say that workplace conflicts cause the biggest tensions. Some 20% of those who work eight hours a day named their superiors as the main source of stress. The ratio was also 20% among six-hour employees. Four hour workers are most stressed by clients and partners (24%) and expectations (25%). Freelancers and entrepreneurs considered clients and partners (32%) as the most significant stress factor, followed by the state of the industry they are working in (29%).

While 33% of freelancers and entrepreneurs consider stressful situations rather motivating, the same amount of regular employees consider it a blocking factor. Some three out of ten have already left a job due to stress being too much to handle. The ratio can be considered very high, according to the research, and the phenomenon is most prevalent in those between 40-49 years of age.

Some 39% of respondents choose to "talk it out" when dealing with stress, with 28% preferring to have some coffee and 20% deciding to have a smoke as their method. While the most healthy alternative is to do sports, only about 21% practice this as a way of taking care of the issue.

About 67% of employees sleep between six and seven hours a day, with 20% sleeping less, which includes a high number of manual laborers. 

More than half (55%) of the respondents have no breaks at all at the workplace, while 13% do have some, but fail to regularly use it.  Approximately 13% had some kind of an illness related to workplace stress, with such illnesses the most prevalent among those who had to change jobs.